What is the Right way to Measure My Bra Size? Part 2



Modern Sizing and how to get a Bra that Fits

1 Measure your band size. This is the easiest part of the process — your band size should be fairly stable and straightforward.

  • Run a tape measure all the way around your body just underneath your breasts and take a measurement in inches. Make sure the tape measure is horizontal and fairly snug. Your arms should be down. Write down this number.
  • If this measurement is an odd number, then you should try out bras in both the size below your measurement and the size above. [7] For example, if you measured 31 inches (78.7cm), your band size could be 30 or 32.
  • If your measurement is already an even number, this is almost always your band size, but you may need a smaller or larger size depending on your body type. For example, if your band size is smaller than 28, you may want to go up a band size since these sizes run quite tight. If you do this, you should go down a cup size so your cups will have the same volume (known as a ‘sister size’). So if you are a 26C, you may find a 28B is more comfortable.

2 Determine your cup size. Remember, your cup size isn't an absolute measure — it's in proportion to your band size.

  • Bend over so that your chest is parallel to the ground. This is so that you'll be measuring all of your breast tissue — not just what protrudes outward when you're standing up.
  • Measure around your torso, so that the tape is over the fullest part of your breasts. Don't pull the tape too tightly — it should be tight enough that it doesn't evenly move, but not so tight that's pressing into your breast tissue. Write down the number.
  • Make sure your tape measure is level to the ground. It shouldn't be a few inches down your back, or you'll end up with an uneven measurement. To combat this, try to measure yourself in front of a mirror, or ask your partner or close friend to help you.
  • Calculate your cup size. To do this, you'll subtract your band measurement from the cup measurement you just took. The difference between the two numbers determines your cup size:
  • Less than 1 inch (2.5 cm) = AA
  • 1 inch (2.5 cm) = A
  • 2 inches (5 cm) = B
  • 3 inches (7.5 cm) = C
  • 4 inches (10 cm) = D
  • 5 inches (12.5 cm) = DD
  • 6 inches (15 cm) = DDD (E in UK sizing)
  • 7 inches (18 cm) = DDDD/F (F in UK sizing)
  • 8 inches (20.5 cm) = G/H (FF in UK sizing)
  • 9 inches (23 cm) = I/J (G in UK sizing)
  • 10 inches (25.5 cm) = J (GG in UK sizing)
  • The majority of leading brands use UK cup sizing: AA, A, B, C, D, DD, E, F, FF, G, GG, H, HH, J, JJ, K, KK, L, LL. If you're shopping in the US you might see cup sizes such as DDD or DDDD. These are equivalent to E and F. If you're in any doubt, particularly with larger cup sizes, you can refer to an international bra sizing chart.

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